Gorillaz-Unofficial (gorillaz_news) wrote,
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Damon, Jamie, Murdoc and Noodle on 'Friday Night With Jonathan Ross' (video, transcript, pics)

Last night, Gorillaz co-creators Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett made an appearance on the popular UK chat show 'Friday Night With Jonathan Ross'. Murdoc and Noodle also made an appearance as you will see. It's a very funny interview and is not to be missed by any Gorillaz fan! Gorillaz-Unofficial has the full video for download, and you can read the transcript of the interview, and see many pictures too.




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http://rapidshare.de/files/8166960/part1.mpg

PART TWO:-

http://rapidshare.de/files/8168258/part2.mpg

PART THREE:-

http://rapidshare.de/files/8168818/part3.mpg.html


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TRANSCRIPT AND PICTURES:-


Jonathon Ross (JR): Our next guests are the demented brains behind the post-apocalyptic band, the [sic] Gorillaz. First here's their new single from the number one album Demon Days, 'Dirty Harry', look at this.



*cuts to video of Dirty Harry, plays from the start until when the beat comes in*



JR: Will you please welcome Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett, ladies and gentlemen!



*the house band ( who are called "Four Poofs and a Piano" ) sing the chorus of 'Clint Eastwood' (they have tshirts with the faces of 2d, Murdoc, Noodle and Russel) as Jamie and Damon come on*







JR: Damon, how are you? Jamie, nice to have you on the show. Thank you for coming on. Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett, ladies and gentlemen. Now, I suspect, most of you recognise Damon. You'll know him from the big hit popular beat band Blur. Jamie you might not be so familiar with, although I'm probably more excited that Jamie's on the show than you Damon, no disrespect...



Damon Albarn (DA): None taken...



JR: because I'm a huge fan of Jamie's work, you used to illustrate comic books many years ago, didn't you?

Jamie Hewlett (JH): Yes, many years ago..

JR: you're one of the most famous illustrators in the country for that sort of thing. You worked on Judge Dredd for a while, I believe?

JH: I did one Judge Dredd.

JR: That's more than enough, come on!

JH: Yes it was, really but..

JR: Tank Girl of course was a big hit.



JH: Yes...

JR: And then made into a terrible bloody movie

JH: Yes.

JR: So how did you guys get together, what was the idea behind Gorillaz, why did you want to do it in the first place?



JH: Well we shared a flat in West London for a year. And...

JR: What, you are a couple, or..? *audience laughs*

JH: No, not that sort of thing. Separate rooms!

JR: But you were single at the time...

JH: Yeah we were both single at the time.

JR: *to Damon* What are you doing? What are you staring at me like that for? What's wrong with you Damon?




DA: I'm trying not to laugh *Jamie starts laughing, as does Jonathan Ross* I've promised myself I'm not going to laugh...

JR: Ok, no laughs! Stay serious!

DA: ...but it's hard!

JR: But why do you want to stay serious? What's wrong with having a laugh? Relax, have a little bit of a laugh!

JH: Don't laugh at any of his jokes, they said...







*Jonathan Ross gets out his seat and tickles Jamie* *Jamie and Damon laugh and so does audience, then Jonahtan Ross runs round behind Damon and tickles him too*



JR: there's a little tickle *audience laughs* Ok! What's wrong with that? What's wrong with that? Haha! WHat's wrong with three middle-aged men tickling each other? *audience laughs*



JH: Did you say three middle-aged men?

JR: Well how old are you??

JH: Well... thirty... something... *smiles*

JR: Well! What's that! That's middle aged! From thirty onwards, boom, middle aged!

JH: Middle aged is 45, isn't it?

JR: Well I am 45, but you're thirty... six? Thirty seven?

DH: Thirty... I'm nearly. Well, I'm thirty-seven.

JR: *to Jamie* You're thirty.. how old did you say?

JH: Same as him *indicated Damon* thirty-seven.



JR: But you've obviously lead quite a rough life *audience laughs and so do Damon and Jamie* there's nothing wrong with it, I'm glad you lived! But Gorillaz, because Blur were, became this huge thing, became this huge band, and still are of course *Damon nods* I know they still operate. And Gorillaz, when you stepped out with Gorillaz, it seemed kind of a strange move I thought, and I didn't quite understand it at first. I was delighted, because I love the look, I love the idea. It was a really... a bold move.

DA: To step out of it?

JR: Well to step out of Blur for a start, and also to come out with something, to renter the arena with something so unsual, a band that doesn't actually exist, but with kind of cartoon versions of you...



DA: Well we were sitting on a couch watching MTV. And we just became sick of it all. And we just wanted to do something that was better than that... But...

JH: Everything was celebrity-led, without any sort of content. So we thought we'd do something and remove the celebrity element, and create pretend celebrities. Manufacture a band but do it properly.



DA: Being in a band can make you feel like a cartoon. So... just become a cartoon. Accept it.

JR: I've seen Gorillaz live. I know you've done a couple of gigs recently, you had a big gig in Manchester, didn't you, recently?

JH: Did you not see them?

JR: I didn't go there, no.

JH: They were much better than the original live gigs.

JR: Well I loved the original live gigs. I love the concept behind it, the idea, because it wasn't just the fact that you'd created these characters, but you'd created such clever characters. Who are the four characters in the band, what are their names?



JH: Murdoc, Russel, 2D and Noodle.

JR: Russel's the drummer guy, isn't he?

JH: Russel's the drummer.

JR: 2D... and Noodle's the little Japanese girl, isn't she?

JH: Noodle's the little Japanese girl, yeah.

JR: ... who was fed-exed in to the band, I believe.

JH: That's right, she arrived in a crate.

JR: ANd I just think there's a very clever combination of you know, people, attaching to the mood of the moment, and what was happening at the time. And I wanted to see how you would get away with doing it.. and you kind of did it behind a screen, didn't you, the first time you performed live? *Jamie and Damon nod* And there were shadows were there? Were there puppets involved? Or masks? What did you do to give the effect that the band were there?



DA: Well a few people behind the screen had kind of cartoon head things on...

JR: So, to match the shape of the characters that we would have known by then?

DA: Yeah

JR: It kind of worked well, it was a good effect. But you don't do that now. What do you do now?



DA: We weren't really doing something that was necessarily related to the characters. We just thought the album deserved to be played from beginning to end. And it had got such an amazing group of people on it, from Ike Turner, to Shaun Ryder, to Neneh Cherry, De La Soul, Pharcyde, Dennis Hopper, Roots Manuva, Martina Topley-Bird...



JR: Some of those I've heard of *audience laughs*

DA: You've heard of them all.

JR: You know what I like about you Damon, in particular, is you're so open to working with other people, and you're so open to talent out there which is, you know, quite something, and you've been working with a lot of what we would call World Music musicians, people who are from other parts of the world, who aren't in the pop or rock mainstream...

DA: Well it's not World Music, because we're World Music...

JR: But I think we think of ourselves, when we talk about Pop Music, we think of it as being like America,..



DA: Well we've got this very myopic idea about what music is. And I've just been really fortunate to do quite a lot of travelling and meet a lot of amazing lovely people. Stuff has come out of that experience...

JR: I thought it was very interesting, because you were one of the first people to speak out against the, I don't know... the 'booking policy' would be the right phrase, but the kind of approach that was taken when Live8 was put together.

DA: Yeah I thought, I thought it was rubbish to be honest with you. I thought it was, you know, the intention was obviously really good, but I think it left everyone with a sort of empty feeling, and something like that should have been such a celebration of music, you know, and that would have happened if they'd have had more African musicians, well - just a sense of a community, as opposed to something being really cliquey...

JR: It did seem perhaps at times a little patronising, you know. I'll be honest with you, I could have swapped Velvet Revolver for just about anyone *Damon and audience laugh*.... But I can understand why they brought those names, because what they really wanted to do was get as much exposure in the Western media, as possible. And to do that, you get a band like Pink Floyd on, who are not to everyone's tastes necessarily, but to reform a band like that, that gives you an awful lot of attention. And the other bands, all had a kind of, you know, were chosen to attract different aspects of a Western audience and certainly to get the media's attention. Which I think they achieved.

DA: But, but.. oh.. *holds head in hands*

JR: ... which they wouldn't have achieved with African... because.. seriously they wouldn't have done. Because I know there's some great music...

DA: Yeah but what did it actually achieve?

JR: Well I think we started speaking about the G8, which none of us, or the majority of us, had not been aware of. I hadn't really spoken before, I hadn't really thought about it before. I love the idea of poverty and [conditions people] held under being abolished, but I never really got off my arse to do anything about it... and it made me think that we should.

DA: (interrupting) Jon, Jon,... shut up will ya *audience laughs*. What kind of feeling is being sent out to the world, when a concert that is organised, presumably, to raise awareness for Africa... and yet the world watches it, not just the people in England listening to you, but the kind of the way it all gets sent out all over the world in little bits, they don't se anyone from Africa there, and they go 'what's this all about?'. It's supposed to be about...

JR: (Interrupting) you know I think you're absolutely right, and I think I regret personally not having said something on the day, which I feel I should have done. And I think a lot of people who were involved in the booking of it probably now feel that way as well, I think perhaps it hadn't occurred to them, you know, genuinely.

DA: Well hopefully next year there's going to be something that in some way redresses that balance, you know...

JR: What are they going to do next year? They're not doing it on the scale again of course are they...

DA: (exasperated) They're not doing it! But something might happen.

JR: Can't you be a bit more specific?

DA: No I can't *audience laughs*

JR: Jamie, has he let you in on these secrets?

JH: I don't know what he's talking about...

JR: Jamie. Can I be honest with you? I'm looking at you two guys, and I am consumed with jealousy. Because you two have both succeeded in the fields I would have loved to have done something in, and failed miserably in both. Okay. You *indicates Damon* one of the most popular successful and talented musical performers in the country, and you *indicated Jamie* one of our best comic book artists.

JH: Do you draw comic books?

JR: I do draw comic books.

JH: Really?



JR: Not very good ones. Not so much anymore, but I used to. Are you familiar with Dr.Death? And his sidekick, Spunky the Monkey? *Jamie laughs* Seriously! I've got three pages I'd like to show you. He was a skeleton with sunglasses on. He lived in a little town, and he had a monkey friend there, and there was another sidekick who was a small robot, but he was mainly round, because I found it easier to draw. *audience and Jamie laugh*

JH: *to Damon* he's good, isn't he?



JR: Is it.. Is it.. I know you don't really draw comic books as such anymore, it's not your main source of...

JH: No...

JR: Do you do them at all anymore?

JH: I haven't drawn a comic book in a while. It takes too long.

JR: Isn't there something just so brilliant about comics, in that you create it, you sit down...

JH: Yes...

JR: I mean here you're working with Damon which I'm sure, you know, must have moments of fun.. *audience laughs*... you work with, erm, you work with a lot of other people. Comic books, you're in charge.

JH: Yeah but it's a lonely, it's a lonely, uh, career. But there is something great about it...

DA: *rubs Jamie's knee* aw, bless him..



JH: But I don't miss it. I'm sort of having fun.. I might do another one. But it, uh, I'd do my own comic book and I probably wouldn't work for any of the comic book companies.

JR: Do people make money making comic books though? Do they make any sort of money worth...

JH: I don't think comic artists make a lot. You know... they get by.

JR: Yeah.

JH: You have to generate so much material to make money, that's...

JR: Do you read comics still, at the moment?

JH: Uh... no. *smiles*

JR: What? What's wrong with you?

JH: I occasionally go to the odd comic shop and then I get a bit lost. I don't really know what's... I mean I like the Daniel Klauss and...

JR: Did you read Darwin Cook's [???] new Direction series, where you saw where Green Lantern came from, and... *Damon and Jamie laughing* What are you laughing at?

JH: Because you know so much about it!

JR: Yes! I know a lot about it, and it's...

JH: I thought I knew a lot about it!

DA: Why don't you, you know, plough some of your millions into a series about the history of comics?

JR: I wouldn't do a, I'll tell you why I wouldn't do a series on comic books, because I feel it's one of those things... well, there's two reasons, which are both really very good reasons. One, I think it's kind of, it would be somewhat indulgent of me to try do a show about something...

DA: Why?

JR: Because I don't think there's that much interest in them, over and above those who love them.

JH: There isn't, really. Apart from...

DA: That doesn't mean you shouldn't make a programme about them...

JR: Well maybe I will one day, but I'd be worried, I certainly wouldn't want to spend license-payer's money on it when I could get paid a lot more *corrects himself* no, I'm sorry, when I could.. *audience laughs* .. reach a lot more people with a show like this. Uhm...

DA: But everything you do doesn't have to be completely mainstream, and, you know, so...

JR: No, that's true. But I'll tell you the main reason that I wouldn't do it. And this I think you will understand, is because it's so... I'm almost welling up *Jamie laughs*... is because it's so special to me. And it's so important to me, *Jamie and Damon laugh some more* no, it really is! Seriously, I can't begin to tell you how important it is to me...

JH: It is, isn't it!..

JR: ... how important comics are to me. And I would not in any way... I don't... you know what, I don't want to share them alright? They're mine.

JH: You shouldn't!

JR: Yes! They're mine! And you don't want people talking about them because they might say they don't like them, and I'd go 'WELL DON'T EVEN LOOK AT IT THEN!'. It upsets me too much, it's too personal.

JH: You should, you should keep it to yourself. You don't want to sully it, it's you know...

JR: Yeah! It would feel sullied because...

DA: Here we have the two sides of Jonathan Ross, don't we? The kind of, sort of, the tortured comic book kind of afficionado...

JH: Comic book failure!

JR: Failure??! I'm carrying the torch for the next generation, is what I'm doing! Alright?

JH: I'd like to see some...

JR: And what's the other side, pray tell!

DA: Well, you know, the Jonathan Ross that we all know and love.



JR: Well, thank you.. *shakes Damon's hand*

DA: No, I'll shake your hand for that.

JR: Thank you, that's very kind of you. So Gorillaz, as a unit. Are you carrying on, are you going to keep the tours going? Because I know they appeared onstage...

DA: We didn't do a tour, we did five nights on stage in Manchester, it's not really like that, it doesn't work like that...

JH: We're working on a tour. The Manchester thing was, not an excuse, a reason to get together all of the musicians who appear on the album, to do a live version.

DA: Haven't you got a bit of footage of that?

JR: We have got, off MTV. Now this was..

JH: No, this is different. This is Lisbon...



DA: *to audience* he's doing his job for him now..! *Jonathon Ross points a finger at Damon*... Can you come at sit here *Points to couch that Damon and Jamie are sitting on* because you know, I think, my time has come!

JR: Would you like to host the talk show?

DA: No! *laughs*



JR: Damon I'd love to see you hosting the talk show. It'd be rubbish, but I'd watch at least one episode *audience laughs* Damon, sit over here and ask me these questions, go on! *Jonathan Ross gets up and walks around to Damon* go on, get in there, I know you want to, *Damon is laughing*

DA: (panicking) I don't!





JR: Go on, just once. Damon, go on...



DA: Okay... *gets up and stands next to Jonathan Ross's chair but doesn't sit down*

JR: *sits down next to Jamie* Ask me anything you want to know about Marvel Comics from 1960 to 1972. *audience laughs*



DA: Listen, listen...

JR: Damon, go on!

JH: You got to!



JR: Sit down, look, he's telling you! *audience laughs*

DA: Jonathon...

JR: Just do one link to camera!

JH: One link to camera, go on!

DA: Jonathan, I'm a musician, you're a presenter. Get back where you belong! *points at Jonathan Ross's chair* *audience laughs*

JR: *laughing* alright! Erm, let's have a look at the clip. So this was, tell me where this clip is from.

JH: This is at the MTV Awards in Europe where...

JR: This was kind of the first time you made the characters appear on stage?

JH: This is them, yeah. Performing onstage with De La Soul. Which was a hugely expensive performance.

JR: But you won best group didn't you, at MTV Awards Europe?

JH: We won best band, yeah... it's hilarious

JR: It's remarkable because they kind of don't exist. Of course they do, but, it's a weird thing. Let's have a look at this.



*MTV EMA performance footage plays*

JR: Gorillaz, the MTV Awards, where they won best act. Remarkable. Wouldn't it be lovely if we could have had Gorillaz come to the show, if we could have had the cartoon characters here to the show this evening?

JH: It would have been wonderful...



JR: Well have a look *points to the screen, which shows a film of Noodle and Murodc, using the same 3d models as for the EMA performance, sitting in a room that looks like the Green Room from the Jonathan Ross show* they're here in the Green Room, we have Gorillaz in the Green Room.



Murdoc: Oh, Christ. I said boys, Jonathan Ross? That flowery ponce? What are you doing that for? *audience laughs*

JR: That's not entirely nice... couldn't you have had them saying something nice, instead...

JH: Have them saying something nice...

JR: They've got a Rock N Roll attitude, haven't they? He looks like Peter Doherty.



*cut to the video of Murdoc and Noodle, Murdoc belches*

Murdoc: What, uh? Shut your face, I hate your type.



JH: We didn't base them on Pete Doherty...



DA: Pete Doherty didn't exist when this...

JH: *making fun of Damon's pronunciation* Pete Dotty?

DA: *to Jamie* Doherty...

JR: *laughs* Dotty's at it again! *audience laughs* that's an X-Factor refernce for you there. *to Damon and Jamie* Do you watch the X-Factor?

*Damon shakes head*

JH: My oldest son loves it.

DA: Simon Cowell [he pronounces it like 'Callow']...

JR: Simon COWELL!



JH: *taps Damon on the shoulder and laughs at him* Callow!

DA: Whatever he's fucking called!

JR: You don't like him?

DA: Nah, he's a fucker! His trousers are too high!

JR: Well you can't dislike a man just for that, he might have some sort of a hip problem!

DA: To be honest with you I don't like any of that! I think that's a rubbish part of our culture and the sooner we get rid of it, bin it, the better it is for everybody *audience applauds*



DA: That one they're doing, with those people who have been hoodwinked into going into space, no, but what's going to happen to them when they open the door, thinking they're wherever, I mean, that's a very, very big thing to go on in someone's head 'I've gone up to space and come back' and you open it, and it's your mum there or whatever, not that's not right...

JR: Especially as, I've heard, that when they open the door, everyone's going to be dressed as monkeys, and they're going to pretend it's Planet Of The Apes! *audience laughs*

DA: That's not right, it's sadistic...

JR: It's cruel and sadistic, you're right...

DA: But where are we going to go next? Every time a boundary's broken! Where are we going to go next? It's just going to get more and more sick

JR: You're right... but it's going to be great, isn't it! *audience laughs*

DA: No, no, no... *shakes head*

JR: You're right, you're right, I'm not going to watch it. *conspiratorial wink and motion to Jamie, to say, we'll watch it together and Damon won't know* *Jamie and audience laugh*

JR: I have an idea for a new member of the Gorillaz for you.

JH: Yep?

JR: Have a look at this. What do you make of it? Could he join?



*Crazy Frog picture displayed on screen and Crazy Frog music plays in the studio, Jonathon Ross dances in his seat to the video*

DA: I like it!

JR: I love him!

DA: I like him...

JR: You like him as well? You've got to love the Crazy Frog! *shakes Damon's hand*

DA: Yeah, yeah, I like the Crazy Frog.

JR: (in serious voice) I've got to be honest with you though. His album was disappointing. *audience laughs* His album was disappointing.



DA: It was a nice little bit of anarchy, but yeah, you know, unfortunately, it just became too much.

JH: Did you notice that they started pixelating out his penis? When he became popular.

JR: No, I think only you noticed that. *Jamie and audience laugh*. You spent a lot of time alone drawing comic strips, didn't you?... Jamie, lovely to meet you properly! And Damon, always a pleasure. Jamie Hewlett and Damon Albarn ladies and gentlemen, *audience cheers and Damon and Jamie shake hands with Jonathan Ross* (to Damon) I might see you afterwards...







DA: I hope so! *Damon and Jamie leave*

JR: That's I think the first tv appearance of the Gorillaz...

Update 30/11/05: An article added (from the Independent UK newspaper 28/11/05, viewable by clicking 'Read More' below, which has Damon's reaction to Jonathan Ross's comments about Live8




Ross regrets his silence over 'patronising' Live8
By Arifa Akbar
Published: 28 November 2005
Five months ago, Jonathan Ross was the media anchorman for the Live8 Concert in Hyde Park where a line-up of famous artists performed to raise awareness of Third World debt.

Dressed in a characteristically flamboyant suit, he interviewed music icons such as Paul McCartney, Robbie Williams and Annie Lennox and spoke of the urgent need to "make poverty history".

But this weekend, the television presenter was sounding a rather different note. Speaking to the singer, Damon Albarn, on his chat show, Friday Night with Jonathan Ross, he admitted he was filled with "regret" at not having spoken out against the lack of African performers at the event on 6 July and singling out bands such as Velvet Revolver and Pink Floyd's reunion as part of his criticism.

"It was, at times, very patronising. I could have swapped Velvet Revolver for just about anyone. I can understand why they did it. They wanted maximum exposure in the Western media and to do that they need stories. Pink Floyd reforming gets you an awful lot of attention.

"Other acts were chosen to attract different parts of a Western audience, certainly to get the media attention, which they achieved and which they wouldn't with African musicians," he said.

Albarn, lead singer of Blur and Gorillaz, who has been an outspoken opponent of the event, criticising it at the time for being "too Anglo-Saxon", questioned "what kind of feeling is being sent out to the world when a concert is organised, presumably to raise awareness and the world doesn't see anyone from Africa there?"

To this, Ross replied: "I agree with you and regret not saying anything about it on the day. The [concert] bookers probably now feel the same way but at the time it probably didn't occur to them."

Yesterday, Albarn expressed his delight at Ross's belated broadside at the concert, at which he was such as central figure.

He said: "It took me by surprise that Jonathan was so vocal, and so publicly. But I'm happy with this. With hindsight, more and more people are re-assessing the whole event."

A Live8 spokesman defended the predominantly white, Western bands in the line-up for the Hyde Park show, saying that the organiser, Bob Geldof's intention was to get "headline grabbing shows full of people who fill stadiums and arenas".

But Michael Eboda, editor of the black newspaper, New Nation, which ran an investigation into how many blacks acts had been asked to perform, said Ross's comments were too little, too late.

"Everyone's forgotten about Live8 now. It's a shame he [Ross] didn't say this at the time. It may have had some impact, whereas now, it has very little effect," he said. Other critics of the concert at the time included Elton John, David Gray and even the joint organiser, Midge Ure.

After the negative publicity, the Senegalese singer, Youssou N'Dour, was added to the line-up, and an alternative concert at the Eden Project in Cornwall dominated by African acts, was organised to run on the same day.

Five months ago, Jonathan Ross was the media anchorman for the Live8 Concert in Hyde Park where a line-up of famous artists performed to raise awareness of Third World debt.

Dressed in a characteristically flamboyant suit, he interviewed music icons such as Paul McCartney, Robbie Williams and Annie Lennox and spoke of the urgent need to "make poverty history".

But this weekend, the television presenter was sounding a rather different note. Speaking to the singer, Damon Albarn, on his chat show, Friday Night with Jonathan Ross, he admitted he was filled with "regret" at not having spoken out against the lack of African performers at the event on 6 July and singling out bands such as Velvet Revolver and Pink Floyd's reunion as part of his criticism.

"It was, at times, very patronising. I could have swapped Velvet Revolver for just about anyone. I can understand why they did it. They wanted maximum exposure in the Western media and to do that they need stories. Pink Floyd reforming gets you an awful lot of attention.

"Other acts were chosen to attract different parts of a Western audience, certainly to get the media attention, which they achieved and which they wouldn't with African musicians," he said.

Albarn, lead singer of Blur and Gorillaz, who has been an outspoken opponent of the event, criticising it at the time for being "too Anglo-Saxon", questioned "what kind of feeling is being sent out to the world when a concert is organised, presumably to raise awareness and the world doesn't see anyone from Africa there?"
To this, Ross replied: "I agree with you and regret not saying anything about it on the day. The [concert] bookers probably now feel the same way but at the time it probably didn't occur to them."

Yesterday, Albarn expressed his delight at Ross's belated broadside at the concert, at which he was such as central figure.

He said: "It took me by surprise that Jonathan was so vocal, and so publicly. But I'm happy with this. With hindsight, more and more people are re-assessing the whole event."

A Live8 spokesman defended the predominantly white, Western bands in the line-up for the Hyde Park show, saying that the organiser, Bob Geldof's intention was to get "headline grabbing shows full of people who fill stadiums and arenas".

But Michael Eboda, editor of the black newspaper, New Nation, which ran an investigation into how many blacks acts had been asked to perform, said Ross's comments were too little, too late.

"Everyone's forgotten about Live8 now. It's a shame he [Ross] didn't say this at the time. It may have had some impact, whereas now, it has very little effect," he said. Other critics of the concert at the time included Elton John, David Gray and even the joint organiser, Midge Ure.

After the negative publicity, the Senegalese singer, Youssou N'Dour, was added to the line-up, and an alternative concert at the Eden Project in Cornwall dominated by African acts, was organised to run on the same day.


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